reviews

Cherokee America by Margaret Verble

Cherokee America by Margaret Verble

From the author of the Pulitzer Prize finalist Maudís Line, an epic novel that follows a web of complex family alliances and culture clashes in the Cherokee Nation during the aftermath of the Civil War, and the unforgettable woman at its center.

Itís the early spring of 1875 in the Cherokee Nation West. A baby, a black hired hand, a bay horse, a gun, a gold stash, and a preacher have all gone missing. Cherokee America Singer, known as ìCheck,î a wealthy farmer, mother of five boys, and soon-to-be widow, is not amused.

In this epic of the American frontier, several plots intertwine around the heroic and resolute Check: her son is caught in a compromising position that results in murder; a neighbor disappears; another man is killed. The tension mounts and the violence escalates as Checkís mixed race family, friends, and neighbors come together to protect their communityóand painfully expel one of their own.

Cherokee America vividly, and often with humor, explores the bondsóof blood and place, of buried histories and half-told tales, of past grief and present injuryóthat connect a colorful, eclectic cast of characters, anchored by the clever, determined, and unforgettable Check.

What drew me to read this was that it’s set in Cherokee Nation. I don’t know much about US history and I did learn much. But I have to say that there’s huge number f characters and I’m still bit confused at who is who and how they’re related. There was also lot of different plots and sub-plots that never really went anywhere.

I liked Check and admired her courage and determination. But there was too little of Check and Cherokee culture.

But I learned a lot about the time period, it just could have been more.

3/5

Published: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (February 19, 2019)
Format: ebook
Source: Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours

About the Author

Margaret Verble is an enrolled and voting citizen of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma and a member of a large Cherokee family that has, through generations, made many contributions to the tribeís history and survival. Although many of her family have remained in Oklahoma to this day, and some still own and farm the land on which the book is set, Margaret was raised in Nashville, Tennessee, and currently lives in Lexington, Kentucky.

Many of the characters of Maudís Line are based on people Margaret knew as a child and the setting is land she roamed for many years of her life. In part, Margaret wrote this book to keep those people and that land alive in her heart.

Margaret’s new novel, Cherokee America, will be released by Houghton, Mifflin, Harcourt on Feb. 19, 2019. A prequel to Maud’s Line, it is set in 1875 in the Arkansas River bottoms of the old Cherokee Nation West.

Margaret is a member of the Authors Guild and Western Writers of America.

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Blog Tour Schedule

Tuesday, February 19
Feature at Coffee and Ink

Wednesday, February 20
Review at A Book Geek
Feature at Myths, Legends, Books & Coffee Pots

Friday, February 22
Review at Creating Herstory
Feature at What Is That Book About

Tuesday, February 26
Review at Jennifer Silverwood’s Blog

Wednesday, February 27
Review at The Lit Bitch

Thursday, February 28
Review at Tar Heel Reader

Friday, March 1
Feature at View from the Birdhouse

Monday, March 4
Review at Amy’s Booket List

Thursday, March 7
Review at The Old Shelter
Feature at Donna’s Book Blog

Friday, March 8
Interview at The Old Shelter

Monday, March 11
Interview at Passages to the Past

Wednesday, March 13
Review at Passages to the Past

Friday, March 15
Review at bookramblings
Review at The Reading Woman

reviews

The Moon Sister by Lucinda Riley

The Moon Sister (The Seven Sisters 5) by Lucinda Riley

Tiggy D’Aplièse spends her days experiencing the raw beauty of the Scottish Highlands doing a job she loves at a deer sanctuary. But when the sanctuary is forced to close, she is offered a job as a wildlife consultant on the vast and isolated estate of the elusive and troubled laird, Charlie Kinnaird. She has no idea that the move will not only irrevocably alter her future, but also bring her face-to-face with her past.

At the estate, she meets Chilly, a gypsy who fled from Spain seventy years before. He tells her that not only does she possess a sixth sense passed down from her ancestors, but it was foretold long ago that he would be the one to send her back home…

In 1912, in the poor gypsy community outside the city walls of Granada, Lucía Amaya-Albaycin is born. Destined to be the greatest flamenco dancer of her generation—and named La Candela, due to the inner flame that burns through her when she dances— Lucía is whisked away by her ambitious and talented guitarist father at the tender age of ten to dance in the flamenco bars of Barcelona. Her mother is devastated by the loss of her daughter and as civil war threatens in Spain, tragedy strikes the rest of her family. Now in Madrid, Lucía and her troupe of dancers are forced to flee for their lives, their journey taking them far across the water to South America and eventually, to North America and New York—Lucía’s long-held dream. But to pursue it, she must choose between her passion for her career and the man she adores. (publisher)

6 sisters were adopted by one man who named them after the Seven Sisters constellation. When he died, he left each sister a letter telling how he found them and clues about their past.

The book has two timelines: the present day with Tiggy and the past with her grandmother Lucia.
Tiggy lives in Scotland working on a wildlife centre looking after Scottish wildcats. There she meets a man who knows where she comes from and knew her grandmother.

In Spain we follow Lucia and how she became the star flamenco dancer. I didn’t like Lucia who was very selfish and just not likeable, like her father for that matter. She was so oblivious of the world and not knowing anything about the situation in her country.

I liked the Scottish parts but took some time getting into the Spanish setting. I enjoyed the book and it was fairly quick book to read despite the size. This was my second Riley book and I really need to read the first books in the series soon. I’m looking forward to the next book.

3,5 stars

Published: Atria (February 19, 2019)
Format: ebook
Source: Publisher

reviews

The Chef’s Secret by Crystal King

The Chef’s Secret by Crystal King

When Bartolomeo Scappi dies in 1577, he leaves his vast estate—properties, money, and his position—to his nephew and apprentice Giovanni. He also gives Giovanni the keys to two strongboxes and strict instructions to burn their contents. Despite Scappi’s dire warning that the information concealed in those boxes could put Giovanni’s life and others at risk, Giovanni is compelled to learn his uncle’s secrets. He undertakes the arduous task of decoding Scappi’s journals and uncovers a history of deception, betrayal, and murder—all to protect an illicit love affair.

As Giovanni pieces together the details of Scappi’s past, he must contend with two rivals who have joined forces—his brother Cesare and Scappi’s former protégé, Domenico Romoli, who will do anything to get his hands on the late chef’s recipes.

With luscious prose that captures the full scale of the sumptuous feasts for which Scappi was known, The Chef’s Secret serves up power, intrigue, and passion, bringing Renaissance Italy to life in a delectable fashion. (publisher)

The book alternates between Bartolomeo in the past and Giovanni trying to discover his uncle’s past in the present day. There was a mystery, romance, and murder. The book wasn’t what I was expecting but I did enjoy it. It doesn’t concentrate on the food as much as I expected it to but for me, it was not a bad thing.
Giovanni is a likable character and I liked to learn him discovering family secrets.

This was my first book by the author and I’m looking forward to reading more.

3,5/5

Published: Atria Books (February 12, 2019)
Format: ebook
Source: Netgalley

reviews

The Only Woman in the Room: A Novel by Marie Benedict

The Only Woman in the Room: A Novel by Marie Benedict

She possessed a stunning beauty. She also possessed a stunning mind. Could the world handle both?

Her beauty almost certainly saved her from the rising Nazi party and led to marriage with an Austrian arms dealer. Underestimated in everything else, she overheard the Third Reich’s plans while at her husband’s side, understanding more than anyone would guess. She devised a plan to flee in disguise from their castle, and the whirlwind escape landed her in Hollywood. She became Hedy Lamarr, screen star.

But she kept a secret more shocking than her heritage or her marriage: she was a scientist. And she knew a few secrets about the enemy. She had an idea that might help the country fight the Nazis…if anyone would listen to her.

A powerful novel based on the incredible true story of the glamour icon and scientist whose groundbreaking invention revolutionized modern communication, The Only Woman in the Room is a masterpiece. (publisher)

Hedwig Kiesler is an Austrian Jewish, even if she doesn’t think of her as a Jewish since her family isn’t religious. Rich older man sees her in a stage production of Sisi and wants her. Hedy’s father sees trouble coming and thinks this man, who is an arms dealer, could bring protection for Hedy in the pre-WWII days. After the marriage, the charming man turns into a controlling man who doesn’t want her to carry on acting and just wants a trophy wife to show people.

She manages to escape from her marriage and ends up in Hollywood and carry on her acting career and becomes known as Hedy Lamarr.

I liked the first part in Austria better and learning more about her early years. I felt the latter part of the book was a bit rushed. I didn’t totally buy the author’s idea behind the adoption. She spent the first part of her life not even knowing she was Jewish and then suddenly wanting to save all the Jews.

Also, I felt like her interest in science came from nowhere. During the war when she comes up with the idea of frequency hopping thing but there was no mention in the book before that she had any interest in science and suddenly, she is a genius.

She was a fascinating woman, and this was an interesting read, but I have to admit that I had higher hopes for this one.

3/5

Published: Sourcebooks Landmark (January 8, 2019)
Format: ebook
Source: Netgalley

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2018 End of Year Survey

This annual survey is hosted by the incredibly Jamie @ The Perpetual Page Turner.

I don’t remember when I have read so few books last so this wasn’t a great reading year in that sense. But there were some great books there.

2018 READING STATS

Number Of Books You Read: 39
Number of Re-Reads: 0
Genre You Read The Most From: Historical

Best in books

Best Book You Read In 2018?
I can’t say only one so here’s top 4 in no particular order:

A King’s Ransom by Sharon Kay Penman
Angels’ Blood by Nalini Singh
The Pearl Sister by Lucinda Riley
The Cold Light of Dawn by Anna Belfrage

Book You Were Excited About & Thought You Were Going To Love More But Didn’t?
The Last Hours by Minette Walters. It sounded so promising, I mean medieval and black death, but couldn’t finish the book.

Most surprising (in a good way or bad way) book you read?
Once Upon a River by Diane Setterfield. Totally different from what I expected.

Best series you started in 2018? Best Sequel of 2018? Best Series Ender of 2018?
Best series you started: Angels’ Blood (Guild Hunter 1) by Nalini Singh
Best Sequel: The Pearl Sister by Lucinda Riley
Best Series Ender: The Flames of Florence: A Da Vinci’s Disciples Novel by Donna Russo Morin

Favorite new author you discovered in 2018?
Nalioni Singh

Best book from a genre you don’t typically read/was out of your comfort zone?
Didn’t read anything out of my comfort zone

Favorite cover of a book you read in 2018?
Tiffany Blues by M.J. Rose. I feel like every year I choose one of her covers…

Book you can’t believe you waited UNTIL 2018 to finally read?
A King’s Ransom by Sharon Kay Penman

Shortest & Longest Book You Read In 2018?
Shortest: The Three Fates by Kate Quinn
Longest: A King’s Ransom by Sharon Kay Penman

Best 2018 debut you read?
The Lost Queen by Signe Pike