reviews

The King’s Justice by E.M. Powell

The King’s Justice (Stanton & Barling #1) by E.M. Powell

A murder that defies logic—and a killer on the loose.

England, 1176. Aelred Barling, esteemed clerk to the justices of King Henry II, is dispatched from the royal court with his young assistant, Hugo Stanton, to investigate a brutal murder in a village outside York.

The case appears straightforward. A suspect is under lock and key in the local prison, and the angry villagers are demanding swift justice. But when more bodies are discovered, certainty turns to doubt—and amid the chaos it becomes clear that nobody is above suspicion.

Facing growing unrest in the village and the fury of the lord of the manor, Stanton and Barling find themselves drawn into a mystery that defies logic, pursuing a killer who evades capture at every turn.

Can they solve the riddle of who is preying upon the villagers? And can they do it without becoming prey themselves?

Hugo Stanton is selected to assist Aelred Barling, appointed clerk of the court, to solve a mysterious death in Claresham. The start is not easy for the two very different men working together and both having secrets of their own. Stanton, in particular, isn’t happy having to work for the king.

Stanton appeared on the Fifth Knight novels, which I enjoyed, but I have to confess that I don’t remember him. It was frustrating at times trying to remember since there are references to the past.

Stanton and Barling are very different personalities and at first, it causes difficulties. Barling does everything by the book and Stanton is more of an improviser. I liked to see how they learned to work with each other and started to respect each other. I loved to read about the normal life since the books I’ve read usually centers at the royal court or something.

It was great to learn more about how the justice system worked in 12th century. I certainly wouldn’t like to be accused of anything in those times.

I enjoyed the book and can’t wait for the next book. Good start for a new series.

3,5/5

Published: Thomas & Mercer (June 1, 2018)
Format: Paperback
Pages: 288
Source: Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours

About the Author

E.M. Powellís historical thriller Fifth Knight novels have been #1 Amazon and Bild bestsellers. The Kingís Justice is the first novel in her new Stanton and Barling medieval murder mystery series. She is a contributing editor to International Thriller Writersí The Big Thrill magazine, blogs for English Historical Fiction Authors and is the social media manager for the Historical Novel Society.

Born and raised in the Republic of Ireland into the family of Michael Collins (the legendary revolutionary and founder of the Irish Free State), she now lives in North-West England with her husband, daughter and a Facebook-friendly dog.

Find out more by visiting www.empowell.com. You can also find him on Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads.

Blog Tour Schedule

Friday, June 1
Interview at Passages to the Past

Monday, June 4
Review at Donna’s Book Blog

Wednesday, June 6
Review at The Writing Desk

Thursday, June 7
Feature at Encouraging Words from the Tea Queen

Tuesday, June 12
Feature at Just One More Chapter

Wednesday, June 13
Guest Post at Jathan & Heather

Saturday, June 16
Review at Clarissa Reads it All

Friday, June 22
Review at Broken Teepee

Wednesday, June 27
Review at Hoover Book Reviews
Feature at The Lit Bitch

Monday, July 2
Interview at Reading the Past

Tuesday, July 3
Feature at Historical Fiction with Spirit

Thursday, July 5
Review at Bri’s Book Nook

Friday, July 6
Guest Post at Myths, Legends, Books & Coffee Pots

Monday, July 9
Review at A Book Geek

Wednesday, July 11
Review at Jaffa Reads Too

Friday, July 13
Review at Bookramblings
Review at A Darn Good Read

reviews

Secrets of the Island by Linda Hughes

Secrets of the Island (The Secrets Trilogy Book 2) by Linda Hughes

Do you think you know your heritage? Think again. Dark secrets lurk below the surface of every family tree, as the Sullivan clan discovers in this story about living in the aftermath of generations of deceit.

When Red Cross nurse Harriet escapes the trauma of World War II and sequesters herself in her grandfather’s cottage on Mackinac Island, she has no inkling about her heritage. But as one shocking clue after another surface – disclosing lies, corruption, madness, and murder – she realizes her family isn’t what, or who, it seems. She’s not the first to hold unspeakable secrets in her soul.

Can she conquer her trials and tribulations, like some of them did? Or will she be defeated by life, like others?

Secrets of the Island, the second book in the Secrets trilogy, is a tale of romantic suspense that begs the question: what secrets are buried within your family tree?

I didn’t realize before I started that it’s a second book in a trilogy, but it works well as a stand alone. Although now I do want to read the previous book.

When twins Harry and Harriet return from the war, they decide to spend the summer in their grandfather’s summer home in Mackinac Island. While there, they discover an old letter written by a woman to their great-grandfather. While searching for answers, they learn secrets from three generations.

The book began little slow but once the twins move to Mackinac Island, things started to happen. We learn the many mysteries and secret from many generations, but we also see how the twins learn to live their lives after the war. Settling back into their old lives isn’t easy but slowly they start to live again.

While the book started slow, at the end I just wanted to know what happens next.

3/5

Published: Deeds Publishing (May 15, 2018)
Format: ebook
Source: Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours

About the Author

As a native Michigander, award-winning author Linda Hughes has been visiting Mackinac Island since she was a kid. Sheís spent countless hours riding a bike around the shoreline, and perusing the library and church records to learn about island history. Sheís built many a cairn, witnessed the Northern Lights on several occasions, and eaten more than her fair share of chocolate fudge. Sheís a world traveler, having worked in thirteen countries and visited a couple dozen more, but Mackinac Island remains one of her favorite places.

Her writing honors come from the National Writers Association, Writerís Digest, the American Screenwriters Association, Ippy (Independent Publishers), and Indie Book of the Day.

For more information, please visit Linda Hughes’ website. You can also find her on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

Blog Tour Schedule

Wednesday, June 6
Interview at Passages to the Past

Friday, June 8
Feature at CelticLady’s Reviews

Monday, June 11
Review at Donna’s Book Blog

Wednesday, June 13
Interview at The Writing Desk

Friday, June 15
Review at History From a Woman’s Perspective
Feature at Teaser Addicts Book Blog

Monday, June 18
Review at Donna McCabe

Wednesday, June 20
Excerpt at Susan Heim on Writing

Friday, June 22
Review at Svetlana’s Reads and Views

Monday, June 25
Review at 100 Pages a Day

Wednesday, June 27
Guest Post at Jathan & Heather

Thursday, June 28
Review, Interview & Excerpt at Two Gals and a Book

Friday, June 29
Review at Bookramblings
Review at Impressions In Ink

reviews

Before the Fall by Juliet West

Before the Fall by Juliet West

1916. Across the channel, the Great War rages; in London’s East End, with her husband away fighting, Hannah Loxwood struggles to hold everything together. She has sacrificed so much for a husband who left her behind, a husband who may never come home. Then, when she meets David – thoughtful, intelligent, quietly captivating – Hannah find herself faced with the most dangerous of temptations…

As the war grips tighter and bombs fall down upon the streets, the stakes for the couple grow ever higher. Soon Hannah and Daniel will realize just how precarious their happiness is, as their destiny rushes towards them…

Beautifully wrought, utterly compelling and with a twist that will leave you breathless, Before The Fall, inspired by a true story, hurls you into a London torn apart by the First World War and paints a vivid and haunting portrait of one woman’s struggle. (back cover)

Hannah’s husband has gone to war leaving her with their two children. She’s not happy when she has to move in with her mother, sister, and brother-in-law. Hoping to earn some extra money, Hannah takes a job at a café where she meets Daniel Blake. Working as a ship worker exempts him from war, which isn’t to everyone’s liking.

I had read a lot of good reviews about this and I had high hopes for this one. It wasn’t bad but not as good as I wanted it to be. I didn’t quite connect with any of the characters and even the ending didn’t really move me. Especially Daniel felt very distant which wasn’t helped that Hannah’s narrative was in the first person while Daniel’s was in 3rd person.

It moved too slow at times to keep my interest. But on the positive side, it did give a realistic feeling about the time.

3/5

Published: Pan Books (2017)
Format: Paperback
Pages: 326
Source: My own